Iqaluit Dress Guide for n00bs

One of the hardest things to account for when we came up here was the weather. Suzanne had done tons of research but the weather in Iqaluit is something you have to experience in order to really know about it. We simply heard “arctic” and “-30°c” and went right to Le Baron and stocked up on gear that could be used up in Grise Fiord. We experienced -30°c a few times in Waterloo and did not like it in the least. You’ll hear the term “dry cold” all too often when speaking with people who live in the north. It’s a difficult concept to explain to those who have only known “humid cold” all their lives. There’ve been many times I’d post on Facebook delighting about certain sub zero temperatures to the chagrin of my parents and southern friends. Don’t get me wrong. I haven’t suddenly developed frost armor since coming to Iqaluit. Being chilled to the bones is not a feeling I enjoy. There are days when it’s so miserably cold here that it makes you question your sanity for staying.

In the end though it all comes down to how you dress for the weather. Most homes are well suited for the northern temperatures so you only really have to concern yourself with how you dress outside more than anything else. You’ll encounter a thousand different tidbits of advice across the Net about how to dress for the cold up here. It’s all based on personal preferences, protection from the elements and duration outside. While it is wise to have gear for extreme weather conditions the truth is you really don’t have to dress much different than you would down south most of the time. If you’re not a fan of the cold in general (a) you should live here and (b) your personal arrangement of clothes will more than likely be increased.

To understand Iqaluit weather you have to be aware of two things:

  • It’s cold. Dry or humid, cold is cold nonetheless
  • Wind means EVERYTHING.

For me, I’m a person who has always preferred being cooler than warmer. I find it easier to make myself warm in cold conditions than it is to cool down with oppressive heat. The fact that I’m a big dude probably plays a big factor in that. I’m built like a young polar bear so it just figures that I’d be more acclimated to the north. The following gear guide is just a reference for how I dress any given day in this city. You’ll notice that wind conditions affect what I wear tremendously. I base my gear selections on the higher side of the numbers listed. People have different body types and tolerances for cold so keep that in mind as well. You also gain a bit of conditioning once you’ve been here for over a year. You’ll know it when you head down south and normally nice weather (like 20c) is unbearably warm for you. Anyway I hope it provides a better understanding of what to expect should you choose to come up here.

The Go To (Basic)-5°c to -14°c (no wind)
Description: Gorgeous day. Typically near the end of winter and end of Sall. Sall is what I call summer here. We really don’t get a hot summer (although as we slip further into a Maritime Climate that can change). I find them to be on the cool side of nice so we have a mix of summer and fall – Sall. Cold enough for no bugs but warm enough to frolic without much layering. The lower end of the spectrum you can wear far less. I can recall being out in just a t-shirt, football jersey and jeans on -5°c days last year. Of course as you get into the double digits I employ a bit more clothing.

Selected Gear: Jeans or thick cotton Khakis, wool or thick cotton sweat socks, t-shirt (long or short), spring jacket. Ball cap or beanie (optional), Runners or hiking boots


The Go To (Extended)-5°c to -14°c (light winds w/wind chill of -19°c or so)
Description: Still a nice day but the winds make the cold a bit more noticeable. It also affects your amount of time outside. For day long excursions you will want to dress in more layers so you can add or remove as your activity level goes up and down. If you’re just doing basic treks then it’s fine to dress lighter.

Selected Gear: Jeans or thick cotton Khakis, wool or thick cotton sweat socks, t-shirt (long or short), sweat shirt w/hood, spring or fall jacket, beanie, insulated gloves (optional), hiking or rain boots


The Go To (Deluxe)-15°c to -23°c (no wind)
Description: Very similar to the weather above but the lack of wind makes it very tolerable to be out for much longer. The air is crisp but doesn’t bite and you can feel a tingle in your thighs if you don’t have light pants on and are out for a long time. However if you layer too much you can certainly start overheating with minimal activity. You encounter days like this typically in October, November, early December and the tail end of winter.

Selected Gear: Jeans or thick cotton Khakis, wool or thick cotton sweat socks, t-shirt (long or short), sweat shirt w/hood or fleece liner, fall jacket, beanie, insulated gloves, winter boots


The Light Rogue (Basic)-15°c to -23°c (medium winds w/wind chill of -30°c or so)
Description: A lot days in Iqaluit are like this during early and late winter. The wind chill is very noticeable. This is where gentlemen start experiencing Santa beards and moustachsicles and ladies can cut through glass (giggidy). You will have the uncontrollable runny nose no matter what you wear. Your length of time outside dictates how you should layer. Again you do run the possibility of overheating if you layer too much.

Selected Gear: Jeans or thick cotton Khakis (Thermal underwear underneath optional), wool socks, t-shirt (long or short), sweat shirt w/hood or fleece liner, winter jacket, beanie, insulated gloves, scarf (optional depending on blowing snow conditions), insulated winter boots


The Light Rogue (Extended)-24°c to -30°c (light or no winds)
Description: It’s cold but nice. Perfect example of the difference between dry and humid cold. Equivalent (in my opinion) of about -15° or so in the south. If the sun is out it’s gorgeous to just go trooping around or hop on a skidoo. Bear in mind that if you’re snowmobiling treat your wardrobe as if you’re dealing with a serious wind chill because going at moderate to high speeds will generate bitter conditions for exposed skin.

Selected Gear: Jeans or thick cotton Khakis (w/thermal underwear underneath optional) or snow pants, wool socks, t-shirt (long or short), sweat shirt w/hood or fleece liner (optional if wearing just a parka), winter jacket or light parka, beanie, insulated gloves, scarf (optional depending on blowing snow conditions), insulated winter boots


The Bear (Basic)-24°c to -30°c (medium to strong winds w/wind chill of -45°c or so)
Description: Okay. Here’s where you start respecting and fearing the cold. Once the wind kicks in at these base temperatures it totally changes the playful wardrobe choices. Now your start bundling to prevent as much wind from touching your skin as possible without turning yourself into an oven. Doesn’t matter if you’re making short treks or long, time to start dressing for the north.

Selected Gear: Snow pants (w/thermal underwear underneath optional), wool socks, t-shirt (long or short), fleece liner (optional if wearing just a light parka), light or heavy parka, beanie, insulated gloves, scarf, mask or balaclava, temperature rated insulated winter boots, goggles (optional)


The Bear (Basic)-30°c and higher (light winds w/wind chill of about -40°c or so)
Description: Once it’s past -30°c in base temperature it’s generally accompanied by SOME kind of wind. Even the slightest winds change the dynamics of the base so much. Not much change in what you should be wearing.

Selected Gear: Snow pants (w/thermal underwear underneath optional), wool socks, t-shirt (long or short), fleece liner (optional if wearing just a light parka), light or heavy parka, beanie, insulated gloves, scarf, mask or balaclava, temperature rated insulated winter boots, goggles (optional)


The Bear (Ho-Lee-Shit)-30°c and higher (strong winds w/wind chill of holy shit)
Description: No. Seriously. No. Unless you’re stuck outside already there’s no reason you should be on foot for any long periods of time in weather like this. When the wind chill is so cold that Fahrenheit and Celsius don’t matter anymore it’s brutal. People can and have died in weather like this so don’t play around with fate too much. If you have to go out, dress as if you might get lost. Better safe than sorry. These are very real temperature you might encounter on a skidoo so be very prepared.

Selected Gear: Snow pants w/thermal underwear underneath, wool socks (possibly doubled based on footwear), t-shirt (long or short), fleece liner, heavy parka, beanie, polar mitts, scarf, mask or balaclava, temperature rated insulated winter boots, goggles.


The moral of this post is, yes buying artic clothing and gear is highly advisable but no you probably won’t have to use it ALL the time. As you adapt up here you will develop your own style of layering. To each his (or her) own.

It’s hilarious waking down the street on those brutally cold and windy days and not recognizing your closest friends. Everyone is super bundled and looks the same. We’re all united in the freezing cold. I’m sure it’s a neat analogy on life up here if I chose to dig deeper into it.

Maybe another post…

Advertisements

Two Years Down…

Ian and I haven’t blogged on here for almost a full year.  Sorry about that.  I guess life’s been keeping us busy.  We’ll try to update with a year-end summary (though, here are some pics in case we fail at that).

But until that happens, you should all know that two days ago marked an important anniversary for us.  That’s right…on November 22, 2010, we began our new life in Iqaluit and I honestly don’t think that either of us knew what was in store for us, or if we’d make it to see two years here.

I’m proud to say that we have.  We’re going into our third winter, about to celebrate our third Christmas in the arctic.  Despite some bumps along the way, we’ve truly prospered personally up here.  It’s been an amazing journey in an amazing place and I don’t think we’d hesitate to do it again.

We’re also now considered to be some of the old-timers up here these days.  Only in Iqaluit, huh?

Skiers on Frobisher Bay, February 25, 2012

Department of Environment IQ Day – Snowmobiling and Ice Fishing northwest of Iqaluit, April 2012

Kobo Town on stage at Alianait Arts Festival, July 2012

Just a typical Iqaluit going away bonfire, July 2012

Suzanne showing off the immense pieces of ice on the tidal flats of Koojesse Inlet, August 2012

The Prince of Monaco visiting the Iqaluit Community Greenhouse, September 2012

Sunrise in Kimmirut, Nunavut, October 2012

Water and Wind

It’s been an exciting couple of days for Iqaluit.

And by exciting, I mean, no…not really.

First there was the major water main break on Thursday evening near Inuksuk High School.  It caused such a disruption that the city shut down on Friday in an effort to conserve the little water that was left in the reservoirs.  We made national news.  Apparently someone even heard about it in New York City.  Wow!

Water was back to utilidor users by Friday evening, but there’s been a boil advisory since then (which has been lifted as of 1:00 PM EST today).  And those who have their water trucked to their homes are lucky if they still have any – though I’m reading of many people who have run out.  Word was that the water was being tested and the trucks would be out to deliver it to homes that needed it today.

Then…this happened…

Yup…sustained winds of 60 km/hr with gusts up to 80.  The building’s shaking and the ravens are in a tizzy.  On the bright side, at least the temperature’s gone up to -23° C!

So…perhaps it has been an exciting few days in Iqaluit…but nobody said that was a good thing.

The IHS & The Aviva Community Fund

Yes this is shameless promotion but who cares when it’s a good cause involved. The Iqaluit Humane Society has a chance to win a nice chunk of money to not only help re-open its doors but get some seed funds to construct a new facility. All you have to do is vote. Just look at the poster(s) and follow the instructions.

Be a part of history.

Thanks and Happy Voting!

Alianait Festival 2011 – Day One

With the July long weekend comes the hottest, coolest festival on top of the worldAlianait!  Alianait is Inuktitut for something that is wonderful – or being very very happy.  It has been an exciting few days and now that it’s winding down, we can start giving a day by day recap.

As with many other large events in Iqaluit, it lives and dies by the efforts of the volunteers.  Ian and I have been helping out again with this event and enjoying every minute of it.  I took some time off of work on Thursday to help out manning the ticket and merchandise tables.  It was grey, and most people were working, so not very busy.  But we met some of the other volunteers, including a woman (Hi June!) whose mother grew up a few houses over from where we lived in Kitchener…small world!

Ian modeling the cool schwag you get as a volunteer...

There are two main stages for the festival…the Big Top and the Main Festival stage.

This is the Big Top Stage.

This is the main Festival Stage (in Nakasuk School).

The Big Tent held showcases, a square dance and workshops, and the main Festival Stage was where it was at each evening of the Festival.  The first night was a nice introduction to some great Canadian (and international) music.  Lots of blurry pictures and low quality videos ahead…what do you want for a basic point and shoot camera?

First up was the April Verch Band.  The band is based out of Ottawa, but bassist/banjoist Cody Walters is from North Carolina and guitarist Clay Ross is from Brooklyn, NY.  April herself is phenomenal on the fiddle and performs Ottawa Valley Stepdancing while fiddling.  Pretty amazing.

Next up were the Gregor Boys from Labrador.  The “boys” included an eclectic range of ages of men playing “traditional” Inuit rock.  I unfortunately don’t know if I’m spelling their name correctly – they don’t seem to have a web presence and appear to have been a replacement for someone in the program.  Regardless, they rocked the house and got some folks up on their feet and dancing.

Coming from Whitehorse in the Yukon Territory was a quartet of women playing old time string music with pretty amazing vocal harmonizing – Annie Lou.  They were a little too country for my liking, but you can’t deny that they were good at what they did.  The music was highly evocative of another time, and certainly another place.

The final performer of the evening was Angu Motzfeldt.  An indie musician from Greenland, the program described him as “Greenland’s male opposite to Bjork but with a touch of U2’s ‘Joshua Tree’ and the psychedelic rock of Blow Up Hollywood”.  Not necessarily how I’d describe his music – it was more like Chris Martin of Coldplay with an Inuk twist.  No matter…truly beautiful work.  I definitely picked up his newest CD Burning Blue Skies which also features his band.  But Angu on his own is soulful and dreamy.  Perfect for helping someone sleep in the 24 hour sunlight…

And really, what night would be complete without me stalking someone for an autograph or a picture.  😉

Is that a smile? Or a look of worry? Don't worry, Angu. I am still having trouble opening the CD to be signed. You can run away while I'm distracted!

Don’t forget to keep checking for the rest of the Alianait posts…they’re coming soon…

A Tomb Raider in Iqaluit?

If you read our own individual blogs, some of you may have heard that Ian and I had a houseguest for a few weeks.  That’s right, Angelina Jolie was visiting us as part of The Jolie Pez Project.  There’s even more details about the whole shebang – including some of the participants – right here.  It was a disastrous an interesting experience, to say the least.  The Jolie can certainly be a handful, as you may have read about on my blog, and on Ian’s.

She recently continued on her travels to Newfoundland, and once she left earlier this week, Ian and I came across something that we think she left behind – The Secret Diary of The Jolie.  We thought we’d share the contents of the diary with you…

Dear Diary,

I have been enjoying my time here in Iqaluit with Suzanne and Ian.  They’ve tried to show me a good time, but neither of them have any idea how much I’ve been learning about hunting.  I really need to get out there to experience true survival!  The polar bear at that bar we visited was only a taste of what I can do now.  I’ve learned how to use a bow and arrows to take down anything!  I can’t wait to try out the new techniques…

One of the first beasts I’d really like to try hunting is a muskox.  A muskox is a giant mythological creature with curly horns, hooves of steel…and it breathes fire!  I read about it in this book.  I might be exaggerating about some of its abilities…

But I also read that there aren’t any muskox in Iqaluit, so I’ll have to venture out further.  I took a peek at a map that my hosts have, and plotted my course.  With the right transportation, I could be hauling a fresh kill back by sundown tomorrow.

Due to the cold temperatures up here, Suzanne made me a parka.  I was thankful for it, but didn’t want it to hide my radiant beauty from the world, so I never fastened it up tight.

I needed to look for some transportation.  I found a pretty good spot…you can barely even see me up there.  Perfect for stealing a ride on something…

From my vantage point, I could see something across the way…a group of…animals perhaps?  I’d have to head back to my hosts and return here later – when it was dark.

I snuck out of the apartment while my hosts were cooking dinner.  When I returned to the location I had found earlier, I confirmed that there were a number of large dogs…they must be sled dogs!  Why they would be perfect!  I could hook them up as a team, and they could pull me out on to the land to hunt the mighty muskox!

Of course, I don’t have a sled…so what else could I do?  Then I heard it…the rumbling of a huge snow machine.  I turned quickly and saw a man heading towards me on his snowmobile.

But he was just too fast.  I couldn’t get to him before he drove off.  I was sad.  At least until I heard what would possibly be my way out.  A loud rumbling from afar caught my attention and I walked towards the sound.  Of course!  The airport!  This will be my way out of Iqaluit and up to the high Arctic so I can find muskox!

I decided to return to the apartment so as not to arouse the suspicion of my hosts.  I would have a good night’s sleep and set out.

The next morning, I headed back out to the airport.  I realized that I would not be able to fly further north…I must have lost my wallet back in New Brunswick in the dulse bin.  Foiled!

Besides…I’m pretty sure this sign said “Must be this tall to ride” in its strange hieroglyphs…

Another setback, but not to fear.  I noticed a snow-covered mountain that if I scaled, I would be able to see for miles and perhaps come across something to hunt nearby.  It was becoming quite evident that the muskox was not to be my prey…and so I climbed.

From the top, I had a great vantage point for wildlife that might be in the area.  As I kept my eyes peeled for movement, I noticed something back down at the base.  Tracks!  Huge tracks!  These had to be those of a polar bear for sure.  I rappelled down the cliff quickly and rushed to where I saw the tracks.  They turned out not to be those of polar bears, but of the local ravens.  Those birds are huge!  I mean, I’m easily 5′ 10″…and I felt dwarfed by the size of the tracks.  Perhaps I could perfect my hunting technique with them…after all, they were everywhere in this city.

Just as I was about to hijack another passing snowmobile rider, I noticed the sun was beginning its descent behind the hills.  The day is nearing its end.  And soon I will be leaving Iqaluit.  Perhaps one day I will return to this land of stark beauty.  Of cold ice and snow.  Of huge pterydactol-like birds.

Until then…I remain…
The Jolie

Frostbite & Flippin’ Snowmobiles

Okay so this title is a little misleading. Neither of us have long-term frostbite nor did we flip a snowmobile… entirely. It is an interesting story nonetheless. I was kind of waiting for Suzanne to tell the story since she did all the driving… or is it piloting(?)… who knows. Anyways, she’s being somewhat blog anti-social at the moment so I am here to tell the very short yet utterly enjoyable tale of our second snow mobile excursion.

For those unfamiliar with our first outing on a snow mobile you can delve back into our short history and check it out for yourself. Back then I was relatively new to the whole Arctic cold thing. The deceptively warm weather up here had us dressing very light for the first couple of months. I really didn’t anticipate how cold it could get on a snow mobile during a relatively balmy arctic afternoon. I had my Light Recon outfit with a scarf and thought that would do the trick (…I’ll explain what exactly my Light Recon Outfit is along with other outfits in a future Dressing in Iqaluit post). Let’s just say an hour into our ride in -40c wind chill I got shown how wrong that outfit was. Chilled to the bone, a faucet for a nose and nursing some minor facial frostbite I quickly learned that if I intended to get on a snow mobile again, I’d need to rethink my strategy and take the weather more seriously.

I mean heck, we got that expensive gear for reason right?

My opportunity at redemption came two weeks ago when Suzanne’s manager once again invited us out for a snowmobile outing. Several people were supposed it be in attendance this time and we were to travel across the sea ice to Katannilik Territorial Park.

…travel across sea ice…

This troubled me at first. After all I am the man who fears open water so why not drive heavy machinery over frozen water, right? Despite this blinding fear I was jazzed at the prospect of doing something I could never have predicted I’d ever do. Let’s just say Suzanne’s enthusiasm put mine to shame. While we were extremely excited about doing it, some very serious concerns put doubt in our minds. Besides the whole n00bish fear of falling through the ice we had some really grounded concerns about things like out lack of proper equipment (i.e. wind resistant pants) and Suzanne’s insulin pump. The trip was going to be an all day adventure slated for a 9am departure with us returning around sundown (which would be around 5pm). When we first went out on a snow mobile months ago the weather was unseasonably warm but since then it’s been on average -27c daily with some nasty wind chills on some days. Driving into those wind chills at 30 – 40km makes for a very serious situation if you’re not properly dressed. Layering is all well and fine but if you don’t have something to cut that wind it’s pointless.

Then there was the insulin pump. We’ve seen the effect of the bitter cold on electronics. Batteries get killed in minutes in the extreme cold not to mention she has an exposed tubing for the pump. Even though she intended to bring her insulin pen along, even that wasn’t a guarantee. At these temperatures it would  freeze as well. The night before we were scheduled to go we pretty much talked ourselves into not going. Better to be safe than sorry was our reasoning. We figured there would be plenty of opportunities to do such things in the future.

Image source: Google Maps

The next day we find out that everyone else (except for her manager) dropped out and it was only him still heading out. Cue crisis of conscience. We felt rotten that everyone bailed and that he’d be going out all alone. It’s not that he can’t handle himself. He’s been out here doing this for years. We felt bad that everyone ditched the trip so at zero hour we decided to take our chances and go with him. We layered up, donned the bears (aka the Resolutes) and psyched ourselves up for the journey. Armed with a pair of snow mobiles, supplies, a rifle and a qamutik we set out towards Katannilik.

I have to say driving across sea ice is an experience that’s extremely hard to describe with just words. The day was cold but it was clear and sunny. You could see for miles. It’s kinda mind boggling thinking about it – driving across the inlet with about 25ft of ice between you and the water below. I have yet to drive an actual snow mobile. I’ve always been the passenger. Suzanne figures the guy nicknamed “Mr. Bump” shouldn’t be at the helm until our medical coverage is straight. It’s all good though. Sitting back and enjoying the scenery is a treat I wouldn’t pass up for anything. It’s amazingly quiet out there when the engines aren’t roaring. I’m talking pin-drop quiet.

Yeah, that's frozen eyelashes, moustache and nose stuff. It's THAT cold.

By the time we reached Cabin One the cold was starting to get to me. Suzanne and Mark seemed fine but my hands and toes were feeling quite numb. I didn’t understand why. I was dressed as well as I could. I had 2 pairs of wool sockets on in addition to my -60c rated Sorels but as we sat there in the cold little hut, I could feel my toes taking a nap. We sipped some hot tea Mark brought along and munched on some granola bars while he explained to us why I was feeling the way I was.  We’d been riding for quite a while; something like an hour or so. When you’re not moving as much your heart rate drops and therefore your circulation slows. He told me I needed to get up and run around a bit to get the blood flowing and I’d be fine.

Naturally I doubted this because I’m ignorant to logic sometimes but I followed suit and went outside and ran around for a bit. Sure enough once my heart rate got up my fingers and toes warmed up immediately. It was magic. Suzanne discovered that her pump had frozen during the trip despite being inside her parka. I should clarify and say that her tubing froze, much like my iPod buds do whenever I go out. Basically the insulin froze in the tubing. So rather than risk any further damage to the pump, she shut it down. Unfortunately he pen insulin was frozen as well. While this didn’t pose any immediate danger, we couldn’t be out gallivanting for hours on end. Besides, I had tweaked my knee when I got off the snow mobile earlier so I wasn’t against packing it in a little earlier anyway. Nevertheless we stowed our gear back into the qamutik pressed forward towards Cabin Two.

That’s when disaster struck.

Mark acknowledging our christening flip...

Okay so it wasn’t disaster but it was a fail nonetheless. While trying to ascend the mountain Suzanne couldn’t quite hit the angle she wanted and we veered a bit off course. The rig we were on was very top-heavy so naturally once we got parallel to the mountain we started to tip. No amount of leaning we did could have saved us. It felt like we crashed in slow motion but once the back of my head smashed into the icy snow I realized it was a legit fall. Thankfully the snow mobile didn’t roll. It kind of keeled over like a lame horse. Both Suzanne and I pushed off from it when we felt it tipping so we fell a few feet away from it. We were on the side of a mountain though so momentum times gravity made the fall feel worse than it was. According to Suzanne she was yelling at me for a few seconds trying to find out if I was okay. I honestly don’t even recall it. My bell was rung and I had that nasty salty taste of blood in my mouth. After a few minutes of waging war with the evil forces of gravity we managed to get our bearings. No serious damage done.

Mark swung around and made sure we were okay. After flipping the beast right side up once again we decided that was the monkey that broke the camel’s back (or however that saying goes) and started to head back home. Suzanne’s confidence was a bit rocked but Mark and I kept reassuring her it’s what happens. Everyone flips a snowmobile at some point. That didn’t stop daredevil Suzanne from catching some air off of about a 10 foot hill with me clinging for dear life behind her. As we started to reach the choppy shoreline Mark got his snow mobile wedged in a gully so we had to spend some time trying to jimmy it free. Suzanne was still a little leery about tackling some of the hilly crests that we had to cross in order to get to the flatter open water so she let Mark go at it.

He too managed to flip the snow mobile as well which brought some semblance of comfort to Suzanne knowing that even a pro like him can fall victim to it. That provided a prime opportunity to take some pictures of course. Bear in mind Suzanne’s camera has a cracked LCD screen so there’s no way of gauging what you’re shooting or how it’ll turn out. I have to say these pictures turned out quite well if I do say so myself…

Suzanne walking on water...

Throwing up gang signs at the ice (?)

My wicked cool blind shot at the path we just took and the mountain...

Looking out towards the other coastline past the waves...

We had a blisteringly cold ride back to Iqaluit and got home roughly around 4:30pm. We had spent a whopping 6hrs out in the boonies. Not bad for people who weren’t completely prepared. We bore the war wounds of a nice day of activity. Our fingers were somewhat frostbitten and we were achy like a first day at the gym but after a couple of days of taking it easy we were back to full speed… for the most part. In the end it was an experience that’ll last a lifetime. I’m sure locals and long time residents may not see it that way but for two n00bs from the south it was awesome. Can’t wait till the next road trip.

Note to self… next time get the heat packs going before you leave not while you’re out there. ;p