Iqaluit Dress Guide for n00bs

One of the hardest things to account for when we came up here was the weather. Suzanne had done tons of research but the weather in Iqaluit is something you have to experience in order to really know about it. We simply heard “arctic” and “-30°c” and went right to Le Baron and stocked up on gear that could be used up in Grise Fiord. We experienced -30°c a few times in Waterloo and did not like it in the least. You’ll hear the term “dry cold” all too often when speaking with people who live in the north. It’s a difficult concept to explain to those who have only known “humid cold” all their lives. There’ve been many times I’d post on Facebook delighting about certain sub zero temperatures to the chagrin of my parents and southern friends. Don’t get me wrong. I haven’t suddenly developed frost armor since coming to Iqaluit. Being chilled to the bones is not a feeling I enjoy. There are days when it’s so miserably cold here that it makes you question your sanity for staying.

In the end though it all comes down to how you dress for the weather. Most homes are well suited for the northern temperatures so you only really have to concern yourself with how you dress outside more than anything else. You’ll encounter a thousand different tidbits of advice across the Net about how to dress for the cold up here. It’s all based on personal preferences, protection from the elements and duration outside. While it is wise to have gear for extreme weather conditions the truth is you really don’t have to dress much different than you would down south most of the time. If you’re not a fan of the cold in general (a) you should live here and (b) your personal arrangement of clothes will more than likely be increased.

To understand Iqaluit weather you have to be aware of two things:

  • It’s cold. Dry or humid, cold is cold nonetheless
  • Wind means EVERYTHING.

For me, I’m a person who has always preferred being cooler than warmer. I find it easier to make myself warm in cold conditions than it is to cool down with oppressive heat. The fact that I’m a big dude probably plays a big factor in that. I’m built like a young polar bear so it just figures that I’d be more acclimated to the north. The following gear guide is just a reference for how I dress any given day in this city. You’ll notice that wind conditions affect what I wear tremendously. I base my gear selections on the higher side of the numbers listed. People have different body types and tolerances for cold so keep that in mind as well. You also gain a bit of conditioning once you’ve been here for over a year. You’ll know it when you head down south and normally nice weather (like 20c) is unbearably warm for you. Anyway I hope it provides a better understanding of what to expect should you choose to come up here.

The Go To (Basic)-5°c to -14°c (no wind)
Description: Gorgeous day. Typically near the end of winter and end of Sall. Sall is what I call summer here. We really don’t get a hot summer (although as we slip further into a Maritime Climate that can change). I find them to be on the cool side of nice so we have a mix of summer and fall – Sall. Cold enough for no bugs but warm enough to frolic without much layering. The lower end of the spectrum you can wear far less. I can recall being out in just a t-shirt, football jersey and jeans on -5°c days last year. Of course as you get into the double digits I employ a bit more clothing.

Selected Gear: Jeans or thick cotton Khakis, wool or thick cotton sweat socks, t-shirt (long or short), spring jacket. Ball cap or beanie (optional), Runners or hiking boots


The Go To (Extended)-5°c to -14°c (light winds w/wind chill of -19°c or so)
Description: Still a nice day but the winds make the cold a bit more noticeable. It also affects your amount of time outside. For day long excursions you will want to dress in more layers so you can add or remove as your activity level goes up and down. If you’re just doing basic treks then it’s fine to dress lighter.

Selected Gear: Jeans or thick cotton Khakis, wool or thick cotton sweat socks, t-shirt (long or short), sweat shirt w/hood, spring or fall jacket, beanie, insulated gloves (optional), hiking or rain boots


The Go To (Deluxe)-15°c to -23°c (no wind)
Description: Very similar to the weather above but the lack of wind makes it very tolerable to be out for much longer. The air is crisp but doesn’t bite and you can feel a tingle in your thighs if you don’t have light pants on and are out for a long time. However if you layer too much you can certainly start overheating with minimal activity. You encounter days like this typically in October, November, early December and the tail end of winter.

Selected Gear: Jeans or thick cotton Khakis, wool or thick cotton sweat socks, t-shirt (long or short), sweat shirt w/hood or fleece liner, fall jacket, beanie, insulated gloves, winter boots


The Light Rogue (Basic)-15°c to -23°c (medium winds w/wind chill of -30°c or so)
Description: A lot days in Iqaluit are like this during early and late winter. The wind chill is very noticeable. This is where gentlemen start experiencing Santa beards and moustachsicles and ladies can cut through glass (giggidy). You will have the uncontrollable runny nose no matter what you wear. Your length of time outside dictates how you should layer. Again you do run the possibility of overheating if you layer too much.

Selected Gear: Jeans or thick cotton Khakis (Thermal underwear underneath optional), wool socks, t-shirt (long or short), sweat shirt w/hood or fleece liner, winter jacket, beanie, insulated gloves, scarf (optional depending on blowing snow conditions), insulated winter boots


The Light Rogue (Extended)-24°c to -30°c (light or no winds)
Description: It’s cold but nice. Perfect example of the difference between dry and humid cold. Equivalent (in my opinion) of about -15° or so in the south. If the sun is out it’s gorgeous to just go trooping around or hop on a skidoo. Bear in mind that if you’re snowmobiling treat your wardrobe as if you’re dealing with a serious wind chill because going at moderate to high speeds will generate bitter conditions for exposed skin.

Selected Gear: Jeans or thick cotton Khakis (w/thermal underwear underneath optional) or snow pants, wool socks, t-shirt (long or short), sweat shirt w/hood or fleece liner (optional if wearing just a parka), winter jacket or light parka, beanie, insulated gloves, scarf (optional depending on blowing snow conditions), insulated winter boots


The Bear (Basic)-24°c to -30°c (medium to strong winds w/wind chill of -45°c or so)
Description: Okay. Here’s where you start respecting and fearing the cold. Once the wind kicks in at these base temperatures it totally changes the playful wardrobe choices. Now your start bundling to prevent as much wind from touching your skin as possible without turning yourself into an oven. Doesn’t matter if you’re making short treks or long, time to start dressing for the north.

Selected Gear: Snow pants (w/thermal underwear underneath optional), wool socks, t-shirt (long or short), fleece liner (optional if wearing just a light parka), light or heavy parka, beanie, insulated gloves, scarf, mask or balaclava, temperature rated insulated winter boots, goggles (optional)


The Bear (Basic)-30°c and higher (light winds w/wind chill of about -40°c or so)
Description: Once it’s past -30°c in base temperature it’s generally accompanied by SOME kind of wind. Even the slightest winds change the dynamics of the base so much. Not much change in what you should be wearing.

Selected Gear: Snow pants (w/thermal underwear underneath optional), wool socks, t-shirt (long or short), fleece liner (optional if wearing just a light parka), light or heavy parka, beanie, insulated gloves, scarf, mask or balaclava, temperature rated insulated winter boots, goggles (optional)


The Bear (Ho-Lee-Shit)-30°c and higher (strong winds w/wind chill of holy shit)
Description: No. Seriously. No. Unless you’re stuck outside already there’s no reason you should be on foot for any long periods of time in weather like this. When the wind chill is so cold that Fahrenheit and Celsius don’t matter anymore it’s brutal. People can and have died in weather like this so don’t play around with fate too much. If you have to go out, dress as if you might get lost. Better safe than sorry. These are very real temperature you might encounter on a skidoo so be very prepared.

Selected Gear: Snow pants w/thermal underwear underneath, wool socks (possibly doubled based on footwear), t-shirt (long or short), fleece liner, heavy parka, beanie, polar mitts, scarf, mask or balaclava, temperature rated insulated winter boots, goggles.


The moral of this post is, yes buying artic clothing and gear is highly advisable but no you probably won’t have to use it ALL the time. As you adapt up here you will develop your own style of layering. To each his (or her) own.

It’s hilarious waking down the street on those brutally cold and windy days and not recognizing your closest friends. Everyone is super bundled and looks the same. We’re all united in the freezing cold. I’m sure it’s a neat analogy on life up here if I chose to dig deeper into it.

Maybe another post…

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Frostbite & Flippin’ Snowmobiles

Okay so this title is a little misleading. Neither of us have long-term frostbite nor did we flip a snowmobile… entirely. It is an interesting story nonetheless. I was kind of waiting for Suzanne to tell the story since she did all the driving… or is it piloting(?)… who knows. Anyways, she’s being somewhat blog anti-social at the moment so I am here to tell the very short yet utterly enjoyable tale of our second snow mobile excursion.

For those unfamiliar with our first outing on a snow mobile you can delve back into our short history and check it out for yourself. Back then I was relatively new to the whole Arctic cold thing. The deceptively warm weather up here had us dressing very light for the first couple of months. I really didn’t anticipate how cold it could get on a snow mobile during a relatively balmy arctic afternoon. I had my Light Recon outfit with a scarf and thought that would do the trick (…I’ll explain what exactly my Light Recon Outfit is along with other outfits in a future Dressing in Iqaluit post). Let’s just say an hour into our ride in -40c wind chill I got shown how wrong that outfit was. Chilled to the bone, a faucet for a nose and nursing some minor facial frostbite I quickly learned that if I intended to get on a snow mobile again, I’d need to rethink my strategy and take the weather more seriously.

I mean heck, we got that expensive gear for reason right?

My opportunity at redemption came two weeks ago when Suzanne’s manager once again invited us out for a snowmobile outing. Several people were supposed it be in attendance this time and we were to travel across the sea ice to Katannilik Territorial Park.

…travel across sea ice…

This troubled me at first. After all I am the man who fears open water so why not drive heavy machinery over frozen water, right? Despite this blinding fear I was jazzed at the prospect of doing something I could never have predicted I’d ever do. Let’s just say Suzanne’s enthusiasm put mine to shame. While we were extremely excited about doing it, some very serious concerns put doubt in our minds. Besides the whole n00bish fear of falling through the ice we had some really grounded concerns about things like out lack of proper equipment (i.e. wind resistant pants) and Suzanne’s insulin pump. The trip was going to be an all day adventure slated for a 9am departure with us returning around sundown (which would be around 5pm). When we first went out on a snow mobile months ago the weather was unseasonably warm but since then it’s been on average -27c daily with some nasty wind chills on some days. Driving into those wind chills at 30 – 40km makes for a very serious situation if you’re not properly dressed. Layering is all well and fine but if you don’t have something to cut that wind it’s pointless.

Then there was the insulin pump. We’ve seen the effect of the bitter cold on electronics. Batteries get killed in minutes in the extreme cold not to mention she has an exposed tubing for the pump. Even though she intended to bring her insulin pen along, even that wasn’t a guarantee. At these temperatures it would  freeze as well. The night before we were scheduled to go we pretty much talked ourselves into not going. Better to be safe than sorry was our reasoning. We figured there would be plenty of opportunities to do such things in the future.

Image source: Google Maps

The next day we find out that everyone else (except for her manager) dropped out and it was only him still heading out. Cue crisis of conscience. We felt rotten that everyone bailed and that he’d be going out all alone. It’s not that he can’t handle himself. He’s been out here doing this for years. We felt bad that everyone ditched the trip so at zero hour we decided to take our chances and go with him. We layered up, donned the bears (aka the Resolutes) and psyched ourselves up for the journey. Armed with a pair of snow mobiles, supplies, a rifle and a qamutik we set out towards Katannilik.

I have to say driving across sea ice is an experience that’s extremely hard to describe with just words. The day was cold but it was clear and sunny. You could see for miles. It’s kinda mind boggling thinking about it – driving across the inlet with about 25ft of ice between you and the water below. I have yet to drive an actual snow mobile. I’ve always been the passenger. Suzanne figures the guy nicknamed “Mr. Bump” shouldn’t be at the helm until our medical coverage is straight. It’s all good though. Sitting back and enjoying the scenery is a treat I wouldn’t pass up for anything. It’s amazingly quiet out there when the engines aren’t roaring. I’m talking pin-drop quiet.

Yeah, that's frozen eyelashes, moustache and nose stuff. It's THAT cold.

By the time we reached Cabin One the cold was starting to get to me. Suzanne and Mark seemed fine but my hands and toes were feeling quite numb. I didn’t understand why. I was dressed as well as I could. I had 2 pairs of wool sockets on in addition to my -60c rated Sorels but as we sat there in the cold little hut, I could feel my toes taking a nap. We sipped some hot tea Mark brought along and munched on some granola bars while he explained to us why I was feeling the way I was.  We’d been riding for quite a while; something like an hour or so. When you’re not moving as much your heart rate drops and therefore your circulation slows. He told me I needed to get up and run around a bit to get the blood flowing and I’d be fine.

Naturally I doubted this because I’m ignorant to logic sometimes but I followed suit and went outside and ran around for a bit. Sure enough once my heart rate got up my fingers and toes warmed up immediately. It was magic. Suzanne discovered that her pump had frozen during the trip despite being inside her parka. I should clarify and say that her tubing froze, much like my iPod buds do whenever I go out. Basically the insulin froze in the tubing. So rather than risk any further damage to the pump, she shut it down. Unfortunately he pen insulin was frozen as well. While this didn’t pose any immediate danger, we couldn’t be out gallivanting for hours on end. Besides, I had tweaked my knee when I got off the snow mobile earlier so I wasn’t against packing it in a little earlier anyway. Nevertheless we stowed our gear back into the qamutik pressed forward towards Cabin Two.

That’s when disaster struck.

Mark acknowledging our christening flip...

Okay so it wasn’t disaster but it was a fail nonetheless. While trying to ascend the mountain Suzanne couldn’t quite hit the angle she wanted and we veered a bit off course. The rig we were on was very top-heavy so naturally once we got parallel to the mountain we started to tip. No amount of leaning we did could have saved us. It felt like we crashed in slow motion but once the back of my head smashed into the icy snow I realized it was a legit fall. Thankfully the snow mobile didn’t roll. It kind of keeled over like a lame horse. Both Suzanne and I pushed off from it when we felt it tipping so we fell a few feet away from it. We were on the side of a mountain though so momentum times gravity made the fall feel worse than it was. According to Suzanne she was yelling at me for a few seconds trying to find out if I was okay. I honestly don’t even recall it. My bell was rung and I had that nasty salty taste of blood in my mouth. After a few minutes of waging war with the evil forces of gravity we managed to get our bearings. No serious damage done.

Mark swung around and made sure we were okay. After flipping the beast right side up once again we decided that was the monkey that broke the camel’s back (or however that saying goes) and started to head back home. Suzanne’s confidence was a bit rocked but Mark and I kept reassuring her it’s what happens. Everyone flips a snowmobile at some point. That didn’t stop daredevil Suzanne from catching some air off of about a 10 foot hill with me clinging for dear life behind her. As we started to reach the choppy shoreline Mark got his snow mobile wedged in a gully so we had to spend some time trying to jimmy it free. Suzanne was still a little leery about tackling some of the hilly crests that we had to cross in order to get to the flatter open water so she let Mark go at it.

He too managed to flip the snow mobile as well which brought some semblance of comfort to Suzanne knowing that even a pro like him can fall victim to it. That provided a prime opportunity to take some pictures of course. Bear in mind Suzanne’s camera has a cracked LCD screen so there’s no way of gauging what you’re shooting or how it’ll turn out. I have to say these pictures turned out quite well if I do say so myself…

Suzanne walking on water...

Throwing up gang signs at the ice (?)

My wicked cool blind shot at the path we just took and the mountain...

Looking out towards the other coastline past the waves...

We had a blisteringly cold ride back to Iqaluit and got home roughly around 4:30pm. We had spent a whopping 6hrs out in the boonies. Not bad for people who weren’t completely prepared. We bore the war wounds of a nice day of activity. Our fingers were somewhat frostbitten and we were achy like a first day at the gym but after a couple of days of taking it easy we were back to full speed… for the most part. In the end it was an experience that’ll last a lifetime. I’m sure locals and long time residents may not see it that way but for two n00bs from the south it was awesome. Can’t wait till the next road trip.

Note to self… next time get the heat packs going before you leave not while you’re out there. ;p

Bargains, Traffic and the Great Countdown

Geez. These days are scraping by faster than I like. It’s already Wednesday. No matter though. I’m back once again with a costing edition of the Nunavut updates. We headed to the GTA this past Monday to start our hunt for our outdoor gear. We had priced out some of the apparel a couple weeks ago at a store called Adventure Guide, but Suzanne ended up finding better deals at a wickedly cool outfitter called LeBaron. They have store locations in the GTA  so we figured we’d hit the closer of the two and headed to Mississauga first.

Beware. Here comes the shameless plugging. Their store is insane. If you’re an outdoorsy kinda person this is the place for you. They cover the full gamut from hunting weapons and equipment to outdoor apparel and supplies. They also ship anywhere in the world, except locally (meaning that if you live in an area where they have a store you have to go to the store). We went in with the intention of getting some Expedition style Canada Goose parkas. They came highly recommended by folks who actually live up there and we had tried them on at Adventure Guide so we were pretty much set on what we wanted. Unfortunately available sizes in the Expedition style were lacking so we ended up taking a look at another recommended style called the Resolute. Personally I liked the fit, feel and look of the Resolute more then the Expedition. It’s lighter than the encumbering Snow Mantra style but offers more features then the Expedition (inner & outer pockets, waist tapers, etc). The XXL was far too large for me so I went with an XL. Unfortunately it was the last one left of that size left in black or navy and that size just so happens to be what she wanted as well.  Neither of us were too partial to the attention grabbing red ones available so we were forced to face one another Gladiator style for possession of the last XL.

Just kidding.

Suzanne was actually looking forward to a brown or green parka so she called their other local store to ask if they had any of that style in stock. Thankfully they had quite a variety of colors and sizes at the other store so she asked that they set the brown one aside and we would head to Markham next to pick it up. We signed up with their membership program which gives a 20% discount on everything except the coats (which receive a 10% final sale discount). Either way it’s an awesome deal considering how much all this gear costs so we decided to take advantage of it and purchase some other necessities while we were there.


Suzanne and I tried on some Baffin Impact -100c boots. They’re just about the most moon booty boots I’ve ever seen. You clunk around like Robocop and they add at least another couple inches onto your height. It’s almost like walking in platform shoes. Remarkably though they’re not too heavy so I can’t see getting too worn out having to tromp around in them for extended periods of time. She ended up going for it and snagging a pair up. I on the other hand had fell in love with a pair of -60c Sorel Alpha Pac boots that I scouted at Mark’s Work Wearhouse last week. We were advised to get at least -40c rated boots so these fell well into the target range. Having 100’s would be cool but I think I’ll do just fine with the 60’s. Besides with the 60’s I can make use of my rockin’ wool socks that Nana gave me for Christmas oh so many years ago. It’s as though she knew I’d be needing them. We went with Baffin Polar Mitts for the both of us. Mitts are recommended over fingered gloves primarily because you’re trying to keep your digits as warm as possible and the best way to do that is keeping them close together. She ended up getting plain AuClair glove liners while I went with their HotTips style. We also tacked on Polartec Windstopper Balaclavas (aka face warmers) as well. They rock. Makes you sorta look like an arctic ninja.

After a 20 -25 minute cross town drive to Markham we picked up Suzanne’s jacket and were set to come back home with plenty of time to spare. Unfortunately we caught sight of the notorious Ikea sign on the way back and somehow ended up there. An hour later we found ourselves stuck in in Toronto rush hour traffic. Damn you Ikea! For those of you who know about Toronto rush hour traffic, I needn’t say more. However if you don’t know what that means, try to imagine then worst traffic you’ve ever been in… then magnify that by like 100. I swear… that region is like the most congested, convoluted, confusing and frustrating stretch of roads I’ve ever seen. I have no idea how people navigate that zoo on a daily basis. Anyway, rant over. Once the sun was long gone and we were back in the Kitchener region I snagged up my boots. I was lucky enough to have caught them while they were on sale (20% off). Matched with a discount we received from having purchased some thermals the previous week it ended up being a cosmic alignment deal. While it would have been nice to get some pants and goggles as well, finances dictated that we can hold off on that for a bit. Besides the weather isn’t that awful up there just yet according to our inside sources so we can manage without them for the time being. Once the weather takes a turn for the worse then we can get that gear while we’re up there. The word around town is that if you can get your jacket and boots in the South, do it. It’s not so much that it’s super expensive to get them up there (something like maybe $100 more) but the fact that there’s not much of a selection. So if you’re coming up for long term do yourself a favor and get those two key pieces of apparel locally and get the rest (if need be) when you come up.

Let me tell you something, this stuff adds up after a while. Unlike Southern Ontario where you can get away with wearing Gortex jackets and toques, up there it’s a different story. There’s really no option to skimp or go budget on anything so it’s up to you to find the best deals possible. Don’t think in any way, shape or form that we’re trying to flaunt what we got by listing these labels and prices. Truth be told if it wasn’t for the generosity of some family members we wouldn’t have been able to purchase half of this. Our intention is to help others out who have little or no information about the equipment needed for the up there. We were lucky enough to have people who live in the territory (thanks Mark, Andrew & Milissa) who give us first hand information regarding what to and what not to get. We’re simply paying it forward to whoever else may be doing research like we were and looking to make such a trek.

4 more days before the insanity gets cranked up a notch. Can’t wait!

Gear totals:

Resolute Parkas (x2): $1215.00 (before taxes & w/discount)
Baffin Mitts (x2): $95.90 (before taxes & w/discount)
Glove liners (x2): $24.68 (before taxes & w/discount)
Balaclavas (x2): $ 50.32 (before taxes & w/discount)
Baffin -100c rated boots: $136.04 (before taxes & w/discount)
Sorel -60c rated boots: $107.99 (before taxes & w/discounts)
__________________________
Total: $1629.93 (before taxes)
(Roughly $1750 – $1800 with taxes)